Twitter: autoposting, shortlinks, hastags and mentions

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Twitter: autoposting, shortlinks, hastags and mentions

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Following on from my previous blog post on corporate social media use, here are a few tips to writing good messages on Twitter (or tweets). A similar post about Facebook will follow.

 

No Autopost

If you have blog, it may be tempting to set up autoposting. This means the site automatically spits out a tweet (if you connect your account) with the blog post title and the link.

Sounds useful enough but there are a few reasons NOT to use it

  1. if you publish your blogpost at midnight, that’s when your tweet will go out. Who will see it?
  2. Your headline may not be snappy enough for a tweet
  3. It won’t make use of hashtags or tagging (see below)
  4. If you post, then go to bed/go out – you won’t be there to manage any responses

 

I know you don’t *need* to use shortlinks any more (now Twitter allows long links) but I still think they look tidier, don’t you?

Its the difference between:

The Elements of Corporate Social Media http://carolinebeavon.com/2013/03/17/the-4-elements-of-corporate-social-media/

and

The Elements of Corporate Social Media http://bit.ly/XPITmZ

If I’d wanted to write much more, the tweet would have looked like this

New blog post > The Elements of Corporate Social Media – comments welcome http://carolinebeavon.com/2…..

Use the Bitly service to shorten your links – this service also helps you keep track of clickthroughs!

 

Hashtags

A hashtag is a handy way to add your tweet to the messages about a certain subject.

Twitter works by showing you the messages by people you follow. However, if you had a particular interest in, say, Leverson, then you could search for the #leverson hashtag and see everyone who’s been tweeting about that subject and using the hashtag.

It also means you can block the hashtag (on some Twitter clients) if you’re not interested! (ie #xfactor)

(Note: interestingly, Facebook is reported to be introducing hashtags to updates very soon!)

When you’re writing a tweet, do a search for relevant hashtags on this story, and add one or two to your Tweet (if you can embed them in the wording even better, you’re saving yourself characters!)

The Elements of Corporate #SocialMedia http://bit.ly/XPITmZ

Corporate Use of #twitter and #facebook http://bit.ly/XPITmZ

Don’t go overboard – multiple hashtags is a waste of space and makes your tweet look spammy!

 

Mentions / Tagging

If you start a tweet with someones Twitter handle, the message will only be seen by them, and the people that follow you both.

If you put someone’s Twitter handle into the middle of a message, it will be seen by all of your follows, and they will be alerted to the message.

If you are sharing a blog post – make sure you @mention any companies, people or organisations featured. This will alert them to the content, and hopefully they’ll retweet it.

Similarly, if you are simply welcoming a new client, celebrating an award or talking about a person – try to find their Twitter handle and use that in the message.

If you are worried about client confidentiality, ask them if it’s ok to publicise that you’re working together!

 

Don’t Go On

It can be hard keeping your thoughts to 140 characters – but the shorter your tweet the better. Not only will it be snappier but it will be retweetable. This means that people can forward the tweet onto their followers.

However, if the message is too long, they many not be able to retweet (RT)  it (depending on their Twitter client), they may have to edit it first, or the end of the tweet may drop off.

 

Structure

If you are worried about losing important information when your tweet is RT’d, make sure the less important info is at the end  – ie any comments or hashtags

ie.

New blog post > The Elements of Corporate Social Media http://bit.ly/XPITmZ Comments welcome

If someone RT’d that, the is a chance that the end of the message may “drop off” the end of the tweet. It’s important that the “comments welcome” is the bit that dissapears, and not the link.

 

What other advise would you recommend for good Twitter writing?

 


About Author

Caroline Beavon

A communication professional with 12 years journalism experience and a genuine passion for new technologies. An experienced blogger and social media user

"Really good, start with some theory, end with practical work. Bang on!" Infographics training attendee, Oxfordshire County Council