Category Archives: Training

18 Sep

Stop: you’re doing infographics all wrong

Infographics can be a really effective way to communicate. Whether you’re a journalist, a researcher or a PR professional, using a visual format COULD be the perfect way for you to reach your audience.

However, the internet is full of terrible examples of infographics that offer little value to the reader.

Here are five ways people are getting it wrong.

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You’re doing it for the wrong reasons

When a client approaches me to design an infographic, I ask them a simple question.

“Why do you want one?”

I’m happy when a client answers:

  • “We have a lot of interesting information that we’d like to get across to our customers”
  • “We’ve just finished a big project and we’d like to tell our investors all about it”
  • “We know our audience responds to this format, so we’d like to present our latest report in this way”

However, alarm bells start ringing when I hear:

  • “Another company down the road has one, and we think we need one too”

That doesn’t mean it’s right for you. Perhaps that company has a different product or audience. Even if they are in the same industry, with the same audience, they may simply have got it wrong – who says it’s right for them?

  • “Because it will drive a lot of traffic to our website”

Sadly, only a small percentage of infographics ‘go viral”. You are bound to be disappointed if you looking just for clicks. Think about your infographic as a useful communication tool for people interested in your company/product/story. If it’s of wider interest, those people will share it.

If you chase the audience you may end up dumbing down or editing your content – creating a less useful tool.

  • “I saw one in the paper and it looked cool”

Infographics in magazines and newspapers tend to be content-rich and tell a specific story. Often they’re used to supplement a longer article, helping tell a more complex story. They may have been weeks in the making, with a team of journalists and designers.

Now compare this to the information you’re working with, the time to have to spend on it and the resources available. Will yours look so cool?

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Too much “graphic”, not enough “info”

Equal weight should be given to the information and the graphical elements of your infographic.

Too many examples exist online than are thin on content because the creator wanted to produce something that looked good and would attract attention. However, if there’s no content to keep the reader engaged, everyone has wasted their time.

If you don’t have enough information for a strong full-page infographic, think about other approaches. perhaps a smaller graphic would work? Don’t rule out doing some extra research to add more information. Sites like data.gov.uk can be handy for finding national data that could support your arguments.

 

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You’ve forgotten about your audience

During my training sessions I constantly remind attendees about their audience.

Treat an infographic like any other form of communication – a report, article, Facebook status update or press release. In each of those you should be tailoring your content, message and language to the audience.

 

Who is most likely to find your infographic interesting? What do we know about those people? (old, young, male, female, professionals?)

Having this sorted will help you answer some further questions to decide what to feature in your infographic.

  • what do they know about the subject? (how much do you need to explain?)
  • how will they feel about the information?
  • what do you want them to do?
  • what information do they need / want from your infographic? can they find it quickly?

Also, trying to tailor your infographic to “everyone” means you risk engaging no-one.

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You don’t have a clear message

This goes back to the “why?” question in the first point.

What are you trying to say? Take a good look at the information you’re intending to use in your infographic – what is it saying? Are you trying to:

  • demonstrate your company’s good work over the past year?
  • persuade the reader to do something?
  • explain why something has happened?

Make sure you keep this in mind as you are designing – even write it on a post-it and stick it to your computer, so you don’t forget.

I always get my information in shape first. I’ve got a handy process involving lots of post-it notes and big sheets of paper that really helps me assess my information and help me decide if I need to edit it or add to it. It also helps me decide what’s important and begin to develop an overall structure for the final piece.

This helps me stay on message.

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You’re trying to do too much

Whilst I use quite a few during my training, I have a fundamental issue with those long thin infographics.

My main issue is that  – with no page size to work within – there is no editing or quality control and the creator is tempted to throw everything into it, to make it “better” (read “longer”).

An infographic is not a magic spell that will solve all your problems. Throwing more content into it will only make it less effective. Instead, think – can you break your information down into several smaller infographic images, instead of a full-page? These can be handy for social media, adding to reports or on slides.

Plus – each graphic could have a different message and focus, you could easily create graphics for different audiences.

 

29 Mar

Infographics training at the Press Association

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I’m back at the Press Association delivering an infographics one-day session in May.

If your organisation is looking to improve your infographics then this is the course for you.

I’ve received excellent feedback, and with only 6 attendees, there’s plenty of opportunity to ask questions about your organisations specific needs.

The course combines hands-on training, discussion and group work.

 

Find out more about the course, and book your place, here

15 Apr

Appearing soon at …

I’ve had a flurry of invitations to speak in public recently and, as one of my New Years Resolutions was to say ‘yes’ more, I’ve agreed to all of them.

Over the next 2 months I’ll be appearing at the following events – ticket details below, and if you’re already going, do say hi!

 

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April CAKE Morning

  • Date: April 29th 2014
  • Venue:  Digital Humanities Hub, University of Birmingham, Pritchatts Road, Edgbaston, B15 2TT
  • Talk subject: tbc
  • Tickets: free available here
  • Other speakers: tbc

Official Blurb

Given the wide and diverse range of academics, businesses, students and Heritage organisations working collaboratively on the DHD project, we will be hosting free monthly “cake” (Collaboration and Knowledge Exchange) mornings to showcase current developments, discuss funding opportunities and tackle current challenges. Plus – there will be cake!

Personal Aims

I went to CAKE for the first time in March, and found it a really interesting event, although I didn’t stick around to properly meet many new people! Thankfully I’ve been invited to speak at the April event, and will make a concerted effort to mingle, and hopefully attract some collaborations and new projects.

The focus of my presentation will be cultural examples of data visualisation and info-visualisation – with a focus on historical and cultural examples!

 

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Science Capital – Digital World Meeting:Doing Business with Data

Official Blurb

Big data. Open data. The potential for creating innovative businesses seems limitless. Our communities are looking for useful solutions to complex issues such as mass transit flow, better health systems and effective portals that help us work in new ways.

The Digital World speakers will show how big and open data can be used by individuals and by companies looking to grow. The event is open to all: to those who create, visualise and analyse our data universe; to those seeking new business ideas or research; to those who rebel as well as revel in the opportunities big data brings.

Personal Aims

I’m thinking of focusing my talk on past, present and future of data visualisation – harking back to some of the ‘classics’, to what’s being done today and ideas for the future. I’d really like to present an interesting insight into the world of data design – with some historical context, real world examples and advice for companies looking to explore this avenue.

It would also be great to make some new contacts, and there is a chance to network at the event, so I won’t forget to pack my business cards!

 

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Creating Usable Content

  • Date: May 12th 2014
  • Venue: SWALEC Stadium, Cardiff
  • Workshop: Creating Infographics (50 minutes repeated 3 times during the day)
  • Tickets:  here
  • Other speakers: Dan Slee (@comms2point0) Steve Davies (@filmcafe_steve) and more tbc

Official Blurb

The way we communicate has changed. How can we improve the way we engage with colleagues, stakeholders and the public?
The Creating Useable Content Learning Event is a day of high-tempo workshops that will equip you with the skills to tell your story in a way that attracts attention and triggers conversations.
During the day you’ll discover the benefit of other people sharing your content and spreading your message for you.
With a practical, hands-on emphasis, each of the five workshops will give you the opportunity to begin creating useable content right there and then!

Personal Aims

This sounds like a great event – delegates will rotate round a series of 50 minute workshops using useful introductory skills like social media management, writing blogs and using photography to promote.

It will be great to develop a quick version of my infographics designing course and, of course, meet lots of new organisations who may benefit from my design services!

All content (c) Caroline Beavon 2020