Tag Archives: Cut copy and paste

22 Mar

Ian Huntley coverage (news and Twitter)

Following the news that Soham killer Ian Huntley was attacked in prison over the weekend, I decided to have a look at the reaction this story was getting online.

First, a quick look at how the story was handled in 2 very different newspapers.

Using the ManyEyes Word Tree visualization, I copied articles from The Guardian and The Daily Mail to see how the name Huntley was handled, and which words followed it in the articles.

Can YOU guess which visualization belongs to which newspaper?

Report 1 was The Daily Mail, report 2, The Guardian. The Soham Murders were a very “Daily Mail” story,¬† and highly emotive and accusatory language was used. The Guardian’s report was more factual.

I was also interested to assess the reaction to the story on the social networking site Twitter.

For sake of experiment, I created a spreadsheet of all the tweets mentioning “Huntley”. (I chose Huntley over “Ian Huntley” so the search would not be limited to the more formal tweets from news outlets etc. I hoped “Huntley” would give a more casual, public point of view.

  • I opened a new Google Spreadsheet
  • I inserted the following code in A1 – =importfeed(“http://search.twitter.com/search.atom?q=huntley”, “”, “”, 20)

This created a spreadsheet of the last 15 tweets containing the word Huntley.

I now have the option to use this spreadsheet in a variety of ways:

  • cut and paste the tweet contents into a web application
  • export the document as an Excel file
  • publish the spreadsheet
  • create an RSS feed from the spreadsheet

Now to visualise the text.

First, I decide to use Wordle – a site that created word clouds from inserted text, or an RSS feed.

I initially used the RSS feed from my published Google spreadsheet  Рwhich created the following word cloud.

Unfortunately, this cloud was tainted with user names, and the subject of the true gist of the tweets were lost

(MTF)

  • Still trying to nail LIVE data ..
  • a quick news report (recorded and edited on Iphone)- probably from The Computers show on Wednesday night
  • a podcast
18 Mar

Looks like I’m not into metal any more Toto

Data can be an interesting and eye opening thing.

I decided to cut and paste some sections of my ITunes library into Google Docs and create a data set from Artist Track, Genre and Plays.

  1. sort tracks by PLAY COUNT
  2. remove TIME, BITRATE, DATE ADDED and TRACK NO columns
  3. scroll down to the bottom of the tracks with “2” plays
  4. select every song with 2+ plays
  5. CTRL+C
  6. open a blank spreadsheet (I use Google Docs) and CTRL-V into the top left corner of the page
  7. the Itunes data appear in the Spreadsheet

Obviously this data is immediately out of date, so I am looking now into turning this into a live feed. As a PC user ITunes stats is not an option.

Points to Note

  • I often listen to Spotify instead of Itunes at home
  • I only listen to Itunes when I am working – this does not take into account Ipod plays, or CD listening in car
  • genre categorizations on Itunes can be questionable

So the first chart:

I’m not sure what I find more interesting – that metal is SUCH a tiny category (smaller than Country, worryingly) or that I seem to really like pop. I will investigate this further. Ok – a quick tweak to the options (colour to genre and label to ARTIST) showed that, phew, Ive not turned into a pop-loving indie kid just yet. It’s just that someone thinks Celldweller (industrial drum n bass noise) is alternative (see for yourself). (See, mislabelling , very deceiving)

NEXT STOP:

  • Find a way to make my Itunes data public, feed this into a live chart.
  • Create a flash animation using one of these charts, with shooty out bits that play music from that artist or genre …
  • Stop messing around with data for today and make some tea.
All content (c) Caroline Beavon 2020