Tag Archives: social networking

20 Mar

Twitter: autoposting, shortlinks, hastags and mentions

Following on from my previous blog post on corporate social media use, here are a few tips to writing good messages on Twitter (or tweets). A similar post about Facebook will follow.

 

No Autopost

If you have blog, it may be tempting to set up autoposting. This means the site automatically spits out a tweet (if you connect your account) with the blog post title and the link.

Sounds useful enough but there are a few reasons NOT to use it

  1. if you publish your blogpost at midnight, that’s when your tweet will go out. Who will see it?
  2. Your headline may not be snappy enough for a tweet
  3. It won’t make use of hashtags or tagging (see below)
  4. If you post, then go to bed/go out – you won’t be there to manage any responses

 

Shortlinks

I know you don’t *need* to use shortlinks any more (now Twitter allows long links) but I still think they look tidier, don’t you?

Its the difference between:

The Elements of Corporate Social Media http://carolinebeavon.com/2013/03/17/the-4-elements-of-corporate-social-media/

and

The Elements of Corporate Social Media http://bit.ly/XPITmZ

If I’d wanted to write much more, the tweet would have looked like this

New blog post > The Elements of Corporate Social Media – comments welcome http://carolinebeavon.com/2…..

Use the Bitly service to shorten your links – this service also helps you keep track of clickthroughs!

 

Hashtags

A hashtag is a handy way to add your tweet to the messages about a certain subject.

Twitter works by showing you the messages by people you follow. However, if you had a particular interest in, say, Leverson, then you could search for the #leverson hashtag and see everyone who’s been tweeting about that subject and using the hashtag.

It also means you can block the hashtag (on some Twitter clients) if you’re not interested! (ie #xfactor)

(Note: interestingly, Facebook is reported to be introducing hashtags to updates very soon!)

When you’re writing a tweet, do a search for relevant hashtags on this story, and add one or two to your Tweet (if you can embed them in the wording even better, you’re saving yourself characters!)

The Elements of Corporate #SocialMedia http://bit.ly/XPITmZ

Corporate Use of #twitter and #facebook http://bit.ly/XPITmZ

Don’t go overboard – multiple hashtags is a waste of space and makes your tweet look spammy!

 

Mentions / Tagging

If you start a tweet with someones Twitter handle, the message will only be seen by them, and the people that follow you both.

If you put someone’s Twitter handle into the middle of a message, it will be seen by all of your follows, and they will be alerted to the message.

If you are sharing a blog post – make sure you @mention any companies, people or organisations featured. This will alert them to the content, and hopefully they’ll retweet it.

Similarly, if you are simply welcoming a new client, celebrating an award or talking about a person – try to find their Twitter handle and use that in the message.

If you are worried about client confidentiality, ask them if it’s ok to publicise that you’re working together!

 

Don’t Go On

It can be hard keeping your thoughts to 140 characters – but the shorter your tweet the better. Not only will it be snappier but it will be retweetable. This means that people can forward the tweet onto their followers.

However, if the message is too long, they many not be able to retweet (RT)  it (depending on their Twitter client), they may have to edit it first, or the end of the tweet may drop off.

 

Structure

If you are worried about losing important information when your tweet is RT’d, make sure the less important info is at the end  – ie any comments or hashtags

ie.

New blog post > The Elements of Corporate Social Media http://bit.ly/XPITmZ Comments welcome

If someone RT’d that, the is a chance that the end of the message may “drop off” the end of the tweet. It’s important that the “comments welcome” is the bit that dissapears, and not the link.

 

What other advise would you recommend for good Twitter writing?

 

30 Apr

Should you buy social media followers?

Can you buy friendship?

It’s an interesting question and one even more relevant today as friendships now exist online as well as in the real world

I recently got into a (mini)debate about this subject over on LinkedIn, where a fellow user posted an article, offering a service of buying Twitter followers.

(See discussion on LinkedIn comments  – note: exists within a group – membership required)

To summarise  – the poster was offering to get followers for your brand / product via click-sites like TwiendsYou Like HitsAdd Me Fast. These are a simple, fast way of getting a lot of followers.

However, I wonder – what is the VALUE of those followers?

You may find a small handful who are interested in what you have to offer but the vast majority won’t be. You are doing the equivalent of the junk-mailout, hoping enough will stick to make it worth your while.

With a mailout, you are hoping the recipient doesn’t throw your letter in the bin and acts upon it.

With a mass-follower approach, you are hoping they follow you back, and act.

But act on what?

Are they going to follow you back – because you followed them? Some may. Others will look at your tweets at ask “what’s in this for me?”. If your Twitter stream is full of sales messages, or even worse, nothing at all, it is unlikely that they will let you into their circle. (and even if they do follow you back – an unfollow is likely if you bombard them with sales pitches)

Are they going to buy your product after a simple Twitter follow? Are they going to be so impressed that you’re found them, that they’ll immediately switch to your brand?

You are not generating any form of loyalty by engaging in mass following.

Social Media is “social”

get twitter folowers

My advice to any client is to treat social media in the same way you treat making friends/contacts. You do not walk into a dinner party, hand out a load of flyers with your phone number, and walk out again. In reality you have conversations, engage and entertain.

With social media you need to literally “make friends” with your followers. You need to nurture those friendships, avoid upsetting them and keep the conversation going.

Ironically, one of the Twitter follower websites mentioned by our friend in the original article, seems to actively promote this “quality over quantity” approach. (See infographic left – click for original)

There is some excellent advice here – which all point to the social element of social media

It’s a shame that clients are falling for this “mass clicking” approach, when – in the long run – it won’t benefit them at all.

 

26 Jan

A Good Girls Guide to … co-working UPDATED

Open office (or co-working) is hot news nowadays. The press has been full of it this week, with magazines (Company) and radio (4) running features about this very 21st century way of getting stuff done.

So how does it work? Well, either by membership or a one off entry fee, you gain access to an open plan environment, normally with wi-fi and hot and cold running drinks where you can plug in, log in and work. It has become a refuge for home workers desperate to get away from Jeremy Kyle and the washing up.

In theory it’s a great idea: away from the distractions of home life, you can focus and increase productivity. If you want to chat, the people around you are vibrant, trendy media or programmer types who want to share their ideas and collaborate on some wonderful magical project that will cure cancer or make Twitter fail-whale proof.

In reality, its a bit like being in a library. However, at least in a library you know the rules as they have been drummed into you since an early age. No talking, no mobile phones, no eating and generally don’t be a pain to everyone else or face the wrath of the chief librarian.

In a co-working space, do these rules apply?

If your phone rings, do you answer it? Should it be on silent?

Should you have a spontaneous little creative chat with your co-workers if everyone else is sitting there in silence?

Are they all wishing you would just SIT STILL and stop fidgeting?

If you work in an office you KNOW the person sitting next to you. You may not like them but at least you know their name. In a co-working space you are sitting next to a total stranger. So when you go to the toilet, should you take your bag with you? Or is that seen as a lack of trust? You wouldn’t take your laptop, but what about your mobile phone?

And that nice person that you exchanged a few pleasantries with an hour ago: do you offer them a drink when you get yourself one?

It’s a minefield. But at least it’s better than Jeremy Kyle.

MORE ON CO-WORKING

http://www.moseleyexchange.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coworking

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE51G49R20090217

________________________________________________________________

Recently I began renting a desk at the Substrakt offices.  It’s a great location based at Fazeley Studios in Digbeth in Birmingham and is 50% populated by this very cool creative communications company and 50% by other people, like myself, who just need somewhere to go.

It’s early days and I need to decide if it’s value for money, but for now it’s proving to be incredibly good for me. Without my stuff to distract me I am getting a LOT done. I also feel obliged to actually get up and go into the office as I am paying for it. It’s nice to have people around, and you never know, I may get some work out of it.

Who knows?

All content (c) Caroline Beavon 2020